Too busy to write a full in-depth post, but hopefully I will circle back soon and flesh this out more! Without any further ado, here are my favorite 11 albums of 2011: PJ Harvey – Let England Shake St. Vincent – Strange Mercy Clap Your Hands Say Yeah – Hysterical Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks – Mirror Traffic Wire – Red Barked Tree Destroyer – Kaput Tom Waits – Bad as Me Alessi's Ark – Time Travel Girls – Record 3 TuneYards – Who Kill EMA – Past Life Martyred Saints Honorable mentions: Atlas Sound – Parallax // Wild Flag – s/t // Danger Mouse & Daniel Luppi – Rome // Fucked-Up – David Comes to Life // Yuck – s/t // Toro y Moi – Underneath the Pine // Radiohead – King of Limbs //  M83 – Hurry Up, We're Dreaming // Iceage – New Brigade // Beastie Boys – Hot Sauce...

We're busy working on our Best Albums of 2011 lists, and as a preview of sorts, I thought I'd share my favorite songs of the year. Notice I didn’t say "best songs" and in some cases, these bands aren't even close to being on my top album list. But, these are my poppy, hook-laden favorites (in no particular order)...

The neo-retro AM-pop-sincere-yet-tongue-in-cheek duo of She & Him have put out out a Christmas record and that makes perfect sense. Especially when the album sounds like it was transported from the late 60's/early 70's sonic landscape where Doris Day or Jim Neighbors would feel right at home. The songs of She & Him are not just wry retro-updates though, they bring a modern sensibility that keeps the songs grounded in the twenty-tens (the future!). And on their new album, A Very She & Him Christmas the songs work much the same way. The lackadaisical vocal delivery of Zooey Deschanel works nicely on many songs, like Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, but album opener, The Christmas Waltz sounds almost like an outtake from "Elf", especially with the minimal instrumentation. Things finally start to roll when M. Ward takes over the lead vocals with Deschanel on harmony on Christmas Wish. The song sounds more complete and...

There’s maybe no other musician that can match Tom Waits’ unparalleled track record. Album by album, and yes, track by track he’s been one of the most consistent artists over the last 30+ years. So, it's easy to take each new recording for granted – when you first put a new Waits’ album on you just know it’s going to be good. But, damn if his recent records don't keep getting better and better as he refines his sound and craft. Strange or maybe not so strange, Tom Waits has seldom had any "hits". At his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this past Spring, he dead-panned, “They say I have no hits and that I'm difficult to work with ...

Wye Oak's latest, Civilian, a full and dynamic record Though they slipped a bit beneath my radar, the band Wye Oak’s 2011 album - Civilian- has recently experienced a resurgence in this writer's circles, as friends and I have been drawn in by the sound created by lead singer/guitarist Jenny Wasner, and drummer/keyboardist Andy Stack. They inhabit a similar caucophonous pop region to their Baltimore counterparts, Beach House (also a duo); however, their album is frequently propelled more by the percussion (on songs like the My Bloody Valentine-esque “Holy Holy  “ and “Hot as Day" ). Wasner’s vocals, haunting in their own right, can remind of Cat Power – but with a more expressive and dynamic range. I’d usually provide a “heads-up” regarding live performance, except that the band (as openers for The National) grabbed two cups of Starbucks, rather than some Stumptown – doing two shows in Seattle, nothing in Portland. My...

The Whole Love from Wilco starts promising and ends OK. The first song on Wilco’s latest is called Art of Almost and it begins with noisy grinding electronic noise that sounds more like Radiohead than Chicago’s favorite “Americana” band. At just over seven minutes the song sets the stage for more musical exploration, but then I Might comes bouncing in with 60s’ era perky pop – all bap-bap-bap drums, farfisa organ and even a doo-doo-doo-doo chorus. The album proceeds to move around between genres and whilst almost all of the songs are better than good, the sum total experience didn't really stay with me long. I didn't want to play it again right away like previous Wilco albums. Rather I felt obligated to listen again to make sure I wasn’t missing something. Dawned On Me is a nice “Wilco” chugger that will offend no one, but it won’t be a hit either. Black...

Parish helps UK band Peggy Sue create moody gem Acrobats, the second album from unapologetic PJ Harvey devotees Peggy Sue, has the trio abandoning their folkier past…plugging in, grabbing producer John Parish, and doing their best impression of their muse’s early recordings. And while there are plenty of sonic parallels, the record’s poppier qualities give Acrobats (for better or worse) a much easier entry point than just about any of Polly Jean’s recordings. There also seems to be a nod towards Sonic Youth’s sound, as well. The album is currently streaming on the band’s website. Smells like [star rating="9" max="10"]...

Atlas Sound’s prolific Cox adds hooks to spacy beauty With apologies to the memory of James Brown, Bradford Cox might be the hardest working man in showbiz (well, at least the indie music scene). Between his band Deerhunter, other side projects, and Atlas Sound, there’s never a shortage of his material to access. But the adage “quantity doesn’t equal equality” can frequently be applied. Though Cox can never be accused of putting out garbage, the sheer volume sometimes begs for some editing and consolidation. So it is nice to see that Parallax, his latest Atlas Sound long player, seems to have been reigned in a bit – and has been invested with some solid melodic hooks. Where Parallax still has the bedroom-pop noodlings consistently found in Cox’s work, songs like “Shakes”, “Mona Lisa”, “Praying Man” (with a little harmonica) and “My Angel is Broken” all hint at Cox’s appreciation of 60’s girl...

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